VINCA CULTURE



The Vinca culture was an early culture of Europe (between the 6th and the 3rd millenium BC), stretching around the course of Danube in Serbia, Romania, Bulgaria and the republic of Macedonia, although traces of it can be found all around the Balkans, parts of Central Europe and Asia Minor. At that time, Vinca was a metropolis with a flourishing culture, at the place where across the valleys of the Bolecica and Danube Rivers a joyful relief of Sumadija meets with the plain of Banat. Between 4500 and 3500 BC it was a major prehistoric settlement. Thus, Vinca is a notion signifying nowadays the peak of Neolithic farming settled culture in Europe.


Vinca Culture




“The first archaeological excavation in Vinca was undertaken by Miloje M. Vasic in 1908 on some 400 m2. The works were going on, except for minor intermissions, till the onset of the World War I. They were resumed as late as 1924, but for a while, since the war impoverished state did have but a modest capability of financing them. A lucky coincidence, which raised hopes, was an advertisement in "The Times" by Sir Charles Hyde, offering financial aid for "excavation of remains", which came into possession of M. M. Vasic through Alec Brown, a writer and a war comrade John Linton Myres, the then Oxford University professor. With good recommendation of the past excavations in Vinca and the help of British friends, considerable finance flew in and enabled resumption of works on a large scale. They were widely covered, particularly by the British press ("Birmingham Post", "Man", "Illustrated London News", etc.). Thus Vinca came into the focus of attention of archaeological science between 1929 and 1931, the site being visited by known science and culture personalities of Europe and the country (Ch. Hyde, J. L. Myres, W. A. Hurtley, Veselin Cajkanovic, Bogdan Popovic, to mention but a few).


Vinca Culture




The Prehistoric Vinca in four volumes (Beograd, 1932, 1936) and about 40 bibliographical articles written mainly by M. M. Vasic, marked the completion of the second stage of excavations.. Another 47 years should have passed to launch the Vinca works anew. The site bad been left to illegal excavations, to the profile destruction by various amateurs and collectors.


Vinca Culture




Only when the Serbian Academy of Sciences and Arts established a Committee on the Vinca Archaeological Excavations, and practically when Vasa Cubrilovic, the President, and Jovan Todorovic, Vice-president, took an interest in it, new excavations were undertaken, in 1978. At the outset, while the Bronze Age and the Middle Age layers were examined, the works proceeded under the guidance of Nikola Tasic in association with Gordana Vujovic. Since 1982 Neolithic layers have been worked on, under the responsibility of Milutin Garasanin and Dragoslav Srejovic.”